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Yes, But Not QuiteEncountering Josiah Royce's Ethico-Religious Insight$
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Dwayne A. Tunstall

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780823230549

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823230549.001.0001

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The “Conception of God” Debate: Setting the Stage for Royce's Personalism

The “Conception of God” Debate: Setting the Stage for Royce's Personalism

Chapter:
(p.9) One The “Conception of God” Debate: Setting the Stage for Royce's Personalism
Source:
Yes, But Not Quite
Author(s):

Dwayne A. Tunstall

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823230549.003.0002

This chapter presents a brief history of the Royce–Howison debate in 1895 and reconstructs George Holmes Howison's critiques of Royce's mostly epistemic arguments for God's existence, as Royce articulated them in The Religious Aspect of Philosophy. It argues that because Howison serves as Josiah Royce's philosophical foil during his “middle” period, Royce's idealism gradually becomes more similar to Howison's personal idealism. It also analyzes Royce's modified ontological argument for God's existence in his 1895 lecture “The Conception of God”. Additionally, it describes how Howison's criticism is a valid one, even though he misinterprets Royce's idealism and its argument for God's existence.

Keywords:   George Holmes Howison, idealism, Religious Aspect of Philosophy, God, The Conception of God, Josiah Royce

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