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Church and SocietyThe Laurence J. McGinley Lectures, 1988-2007$
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Avery Cardinal Dulles

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780823228621

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823228621.001.0001

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The Ignatian Tradition and Contemporary Theology

The Ignatian Tradition and Contemporary Theology

April 10, 1997

Chapter:
(p.234) 17 The Ignatian Tradition and Contemporary Theology
Source:
Church and Society
Author(s):

Avery Cardinal Dulles

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823228621.003.0017

This chapter discusses the Ignatian tradition, looking at the Spiritual Exercises and teachings of St. Ignatius of Loyola. It comments on four themes from the Spiritual Exercises that have particularly inspired twentieth-century theologians: seeking God in all things, the immediacy of the soul to God, obedience to the hierarchical Church, and the call to glorify Christ the King by free and loving self-surrender into his hands. It illustrates each of these themes—the cosmic, the theistic, the ecclesial, and the Christological—from the writings of the theologians mentioned in the discussion. The chapter concludes that the Ignatian charism consists in the ability to combine the two tendencies without detriment to either. For Ignatius it was axiomatic that Christians are called to achieve authentic freedom by surrendering their limited freedom into the hands of Christ.

Keywords:   Ignatian tradition, Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius of Loyola, immediacy, ecclesial obedience, charism

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