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Ecce MonstrumGeorges Bataille and the Sacrifice of Form$
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Jeremy Biles

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780823227785

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823227785.001.0001

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The Cross: Simone Weil's Hyperchristianity

The Cross: Simone Weil's Hyperchristianity

Chapter:
(p.95) Four The Cross: Simone Weil's Hyperchristianity
Source:
Ecce Monstrum
Author(s):

Jeremy Biles

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823227785.003.0005

This chapter examines the connection between Simone Weil and St. Lazarus that emerges in Georges Bataille's novel Blue of Noon, arguing that Weil plays the role of a daimonic but saintly intercessor for Bataille in formulating an extremist surrealism. This anti-Bretonian surrealism is not only indebted to a certain reading of Weil, but coincides with Bataille's notion of hyperchristianity as embodied by the mystically inclined Weil. Bataille's decision to withhold publishing Blue of Noon until 1957—more than twenty years after authoring it and more than a decade after Weil's death—offers important clues to how to read not only the book but also Bataille's concept of hyperchristianity. The chapter discusses three quintessentially surrealist terms—chance, dream, and automatism. If the tension involved in the maintenance of this back-and-forth movement is understood as the passionate rage that communicates the high and the low, the verticality of ascent with the horizontality of the labyrinth, then it is no wonder that both Bataille and Weil, in mutually illuminating ways, find the cross at the heart of the labyrinth.

Keywords:   Simone Weil, Lazarus, surrealism, Blue of Noon, hyperchristianity, chance, dreams, automatism, cross, labyrinth

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