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Love and Other TechnologiesRetrofitting Eros for the Information Age$
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Dominic Pettman

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823226689

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823226689.001.0001

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Love and Other Technologies

Love and Other Technologies

Chapter:
(p.16) One Love and Other Technologies
Source:
Love and Other Technologies
Author(s):

Dominic Pettman

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823226689.003.0002

This portion indicates the salient terms and conceptual frameworks required for the integration of eros, technics, and communitas. Technology, on the one hand, is not only defined as any set produced by technical means, but also described as the language (verbal or gestural) that binds “strangers;” while on the other, love can be expressed in the context of sexual desires, unconditional affection, and universal devotion to make communities prosper. Consequently, it is inferred that love is a technical tool of the community; likewise, technology is the result of one's love to his/her community. “Lover's discourse” seems to become universal across various periods of time considering the imperfections entailed in the discussion of love such as the “illusion of autonomy,” interchangeability, and irreplaceability.

Keywords:   technology, language, strangers, community, lover's discourse, illusion of autonomy, interchangeability, irreplaceability

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