Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Chancellorsville and the GermansNativism, Ethnicity, and Civil War Memory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christian B. Keller

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780823226504

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823226504.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2017

Before Chancellorsville: Sigel, Blenker, and the Reinforcement of German Ethnicity in the Union Army, 1861–1862

Before Chancellorsville: Sigel, Blenker, and the Reinforcement of German Ethnicity in the Union Army, 1861–1862

Chapter:
(p.24) 2 Before Chancellorsville: Sigel, Blenker, and the Reinforcement of German Ethnicity in the Union Army, 1861–1862
Source:
Chancellorsville and the Germans
Author(s):

Christian B. Keller

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823226504.003.0003

Nearly all of the German regiments that campaigned in the eastern theater of war came from the great cities: New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Milwaukee, and Pittsburgh. Nearly all of them in turn would be first clustered together in Ludwig Blenker's German division and later in the Eleventh Corps. After Cross Keys, the German regiments witnessed several changes to their command structure. The embattled Blenker resigned his post and would hold no further commands in the war. Carl Schurz, who had repeatedly written Abraham Lincoln and prominent Republicans from Spain requesting a military appointment, was waiting in the wings and, with Blenker removed from the picture, he got his chance. Not long after Schurz joined the army, Lincoln completely reorganized his scattered forces in Virginia and consolidated them into one unified command. Franz Sigel, whose resignation had caused such indignation among German Americans at the beginning of 1862, was transferred to the east and replaced John C. Frémont, to the joy of the German-language press.

Keywords:   German regiments, Ludwig Blenker, Carl Schurz, Abraham Lincoln, Franz Sigel, German Americans

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .