Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Stanley Cavell's American DreamShakespeare, Philosophy, and Hollywood Movies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lawrence F. Rhu

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823225965

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823225965.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 February 2018

From Cyprus to Rushmore

From Cyprus to Rushmore

Chapter:
(p.105) 4 From Cyprus to Rushmore
Source:
Stanley Cavell's American Dream
Author(s):

Lawrence F. Rhu

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823225965.003.0005

This chapter tells about Stanley Cavell's two major arguments of writings on film, and about the early development that happens in his writings on Shakespeare. Cavell's philosophy became available through his criticism. Questions emerge about receptivity and responsiveness, both for his kind of writings and for the kinds of work to which it responds. Cavell has continued to cultivate his attraction to Emerson's philosophy, and his ambition to awaken the living, not to invoke the dead. Also, while his attraction to the principle of perfection has required him to defend it against charges of elitism, his willingness has enabled him to welcome the alternatives of intellectual fashions at the moment.

Keywords:   writings, film, criticism, philosophy, perfection, elitism

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .