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Is Nothing Sacred?The Non-Realist Philosophy of Religion: Selected Essays$
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Don Cupitt

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780823222032

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823222032.001.0001

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Free Christianity

Free Christianity

Chapter:
(p.46) 4 Free Christianity
Source:
Is Nothing Sacred?
Author(s):

Don Cupitt

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823222032.003.0004

This chapter points out that the essence of Christianity is distinguished not as anything religious but as a philosophical doctrine. The chapter affirms a religion where the story and symbol go hand in hand with values and practices. The chapter denies that knowledge should be justified. Rather, proving its objectivity and realism is more important. The chapter explicates the difference between a realist and a non-realist with the purpose of explaining that we are the only makers of the physical world and therefore meaning and truth exist in places where we only have constituted them. Furthermore, evidence of the history of philosophy and religion cannot be totally finalized for the reason that all these things are like art-products and they cannot totalize history.

Keywords:   Christianity, religious, doctrine, symbol, values, realism, realist

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