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Racial WorldmakingThe Power of Popular Fiction$
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Mark C. Jerng

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823277759

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823277759.001.0001

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Fantasies of Blackness and Racial Capitalism

Fantasies of Blackness and Racial Capitalism

Chapter:
(p.129) Chapter 6: Fantasies of Blackness and Racial Capitalism
Source:
Racial Worldmaking
Author(s):

Mark C. Jerng

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823277759.003.0007

This chapter traces sword and sorcery’s re-emergence as a popular genre in the 1960s and 1970s during the era of U.S. Civil Rights movements. It shows how strategies for reproducing racism despite changing political sensibilities are constructed through the genre of sword and sorcery. These strategies go hand in hand with soon-to-be dominant re-imaginations of free market economics by economists such as Milton Friedman and Gary Becker. The chapter analyzes the work on the economics of discrimination in relation to Samuel Delany’s use of sword and sorcery to reflect on how race gets used to imagine market processes. Delany’s Nevèrÿon series adds another dimension to understandings of racial capitalism by focusing on race as economic utility.

Keywords:   Becker, Gary, Delany, Samuel, Economics and race, Fantasy, Friedman, Milton, Howard, Robert, Nevèrÿon, Racial capitalism, Sword and sorcery

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