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IntercarnationsExercises in Theological Possibility$
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Catherine Keller

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823276455

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823276455.001.0001

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The Cosmopolitan Body of Christ. Postcoloniality and Process Cosmology: A View from Bogotá

The Cosmopolitan Body of Christ. Postcoloniality and Process Cosmology: A View from Bogotá

Chapter:
(p.164) Chapter 10 The Cosmopolitan Body of Christ. Postcoloniality and Process Cosmology: A View from Bogotá
Source:
Intercarnations
Author(s):

Catherine Keller

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823276455.003.0011

This chapter considers the notion of the cosmopolitan and the value of process theology for a Latin American context. Focusing on postcolonial Colombia, it proposes a cosmopolitanism—a “world citizenship”—in the context of an engagement between process theology and liberation theology. In Global Fragments, Eduardo Mendieta outlines a “dialogical cosmopolitanism” by taking into account “the critical and dialogical cosmopolitanism” of Walter Mignolo. The chapter examines how imperial cosmopolitanism colludes with the profound anti-cosmopolitanism of fundamentalism and argues that a rigorously dialogical cosmopolitanism must become ever more attentive to the ecological depredations of economic globalization. It also discusses a decolonial cosmology that will counter the dissociation of the human from its universe at seven points: as globalizing modernity; as ethical disembodiment; as repulsion of indigenous “cosmovision”; as androcentrism; as ecological anthropocide; as the theodicy of a Christian power drive; and as anthropocentric displacement of responsibility, Christologically reinforced.

Keywords:   process theology, cosmopolitanism, liberation theology, dialogical cosmopolitanism, imperial cosmopolitanism, globalization, decolonial cosmology, modernity, cosmovision, androcentrism

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