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IntercarnationsExercises in Theological Possibility$
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Catherine Keller

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823276455

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823276455.001.0001

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The Becoming of Theopoetics: A Brief, Incongruent History

The Becoming of Theopoetics: A Brief, Incongruent History

Chapter:
(p.105) Chapter 6 The Becoming of Theopoetics: A Brief, Incongruent History
Source:
Intercarnations
Author(s):

Catherine Keller

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823276455.003.0007

This chapter examines a pre-Augustinian spiritual practice that comes into an uneasy relation with a modernist theopoetics. The latter turns out to have a surprising pedigree, closer to death of God theology than to any ancient mysticism. However, certain recent embodiments of theopoetics link its insistent poiesis, beyond deconstruction, to a cosmological creativity. The becoming-divine signified by theopoiesis now flows through the divine becoming of “the poet of the world.” The chapter considers how theopoetics may intersect with nontheistic networks of material solidarity in ways that are intensified by minding its deeper theological history. It traces a theopoetic genealogy through an ancient theopoiesis to a modernist and then a current theopoetics and explains how each comes to materialize in the present project by way of a negative theology rooted in the ancient theopoiesis, a deconstruction working through modernist radical theology, and then an ecological solidarity hosted by a theopoetics of process.

Keywords:   theopoetics, God, theology, divine, theopoiesis, material solidarity, theological history, negative theology, radical theology, ecological solidarity

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