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Public ThingsDemocracy in Disrepair$
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Bonnie Honig

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823276400

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823276400.001.0001

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Public Things, Shared Space, and the Commons

Public Things, Shared Space, and the Commons

Chapter:
(p.85) Epilogue Public Things, Shared Space, and the Commons
Source:
Public Things
Author(s):

Bonnie Honig

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823276400.003.0005

This epilogue compares the public things model with that of two others, the commons (or undercommons) and shared space. It argues that while all three models respond to the democratic need, public things have their own specific and necessary contribution to make. The Lincoln Memorial is the sort of thing Hannah Arendt has in mind as the basis of shared memory and action in The Human Condition. The commons model identifies the losses caused by dispossession, appropriation, and accumulation, and public things may well look like one more enclosure in a very long line of them. This epilogue discusses the contributions that all three models can make to the project of preventing ever-increasing privatization and promoting justice and equality in contemporary democratic societies.

Keywords:   public things, commons, shared space, Hannah Arendt, shared memory, dispossession, appropriation, privatization, justice, equality

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