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Believing in Order to SeeOn the Rationality of Revelation and the Irrationality of Some Believers$
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Jean-Luc Marion

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823275847

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823275847.001.0001

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Nothing Is Impossible for God

Nothing Is Impossible for God

Chapter:
(p.87) 7 Nothing Is Impossible for God
Source:
Believing in Order to See
Author(s):

Jean-Luc Marion

, Christina M. Gschwandtner
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823275847.003.0007

In this chapter Marion speaks of the miracle as what we think to be impossible although it actually takes place. The miracle is about what really occurs but seems impossible, not about a logical contradiction, but about an event (it is hence about faith in the event). Christ’s death is the end of any possibility; his resurrection the miracle of the event of the impossible. The miracle puts faith into play. Metaphysics excludes possibility (and sees it as opposed to actuality). Phenomenology frees the possibility of phenomena. The Resurrection becomes the paradigm for any miracle. It appears outside the horizon and displaces or suspends it by saturating our gaze. This saturated phenomenon constitutes the I.

Keywords:   event, faith, horizon, miracle, possibility, resurrection

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