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The Rigor of ThingsConversations with Dan Arbib$
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Jean-Luc Marion and Dan Arbib

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823275755

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823275755.001.0001

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Phenomenology

Phenomenology

Chapter:
(p.71) 3. Phenomenology
Source:
The Rigor of Things
Author(s):

Jean-Luc Marion

, Christina M. Gschwandtner
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823275755.003.0003

This chapter provides an introduction to and summary of all of Marion’s phenomenological work. It also gives an account of why he turned to phenomenology in the first place and what role he considers it to play philosophically. Marion explains the notion of the phenomenological reduction and the importance of the category of givenness. He responds to some of the common objections to his work (including those of Derrida and Ricoeur). He summarizes the notion of the gift and its phenomenological significance. The chapter presents the implications of a phenomenology of givenness for a notion of the self as recipient of the phenomenon. Marion also reviews the notion of the saturated phenomenon and unfolds its implications. He discusses his relation to the thought of Levinas, Henry, Lacan, and Heidegger.

Keywords:   adonné, gift, givenness, reduction, saturated phenomenon

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