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Citizen SubjectFoundations for Philosophical Anthropology$
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Étienne Balibar

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823273607

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823273607.001.0001

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Ich, das Wir, und Wir, das Ich ist: Spirit’s Dictum

Ich, das Wir, und Wir, das Ich ist: Spirit’s Dictum

Chapter:
(p.123) Five:Ich, das Wir, und Wir, das Ich ist: Spirit’s Dictum
Source:
Citizen Subject
Author(s):

Étienne Balibar

, Steven Miller
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823273607.003.0008

This chapter argues that while the category of “modernity” is differential, it is so in several senses that intersect and vie with one another. It introduces certain theses on modernity which aim to “deconstruct” the institutions, presuppositions, and discourses of modernity, arguing that they are always present at the heart of the philosophical expressions of modernity. The chapter discusses these concepts with respect to a problem of reading and interpreting a particular Hegelian utterance: “Ich, das Wir, und Wir, das Ich ist” (hereafter, “IWWI”), taken from Chapter 4 of the Phenomenology of Spirit. In doing so the chapter also takes into account two models for Hegel's utterance: the theophanic utterances from the Gospel of John, and Rousseau's Social Contract.

Keywords:   modernity, IWWI, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Jean-Jacques Rosseau, deconstruction, philosophical expressions of modernity, Phenomenology of Spirit, Gospel of John, Social Contract

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