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Citizen SubjectFoundations for Philosophical Anthropology$
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Étienne Balibar

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823273607

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823273607.001.0001

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“My Self,” “My Own”: Variations on Locke

“My Self,” “My Own”: Variations on Locke

Chapter:
(p.74) Two: “My Self,” “My Own”: Variations on Locke
Source:
Citizen Subject
Author(s):

Étienne Balibar

, Steven Miller
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823273607.003.0005

This chapter explains the relationship between the Lockean self and own in clarifying a previous error which had been made as the basis for a theory of personal identity. It seeks to understand Locke's near obsessional insistence upon these two little words and their recurrent pairing in his argumentation in order to perceive how, in and through the idiom of his writing itself, he produces an unprecedented signification and seeks to open a place for it within the field of philosophical discourse. In so doing, this chapter also shows that Locke's English cannot be understood without referring to certain neighboring languages—in particular, the French of Descartes and Malebranche, who are his interlocutors, if not his adversaries.

Keywords:   language, translations, John Locke, self, own, English, personal identity, Locke's untranslatability, French

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