Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Corporate RomanticismLiberalism, Justice, and the Novel$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel M. Stout

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823272235

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823272235.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

The One and the Manor

The One and the Manor

On Being, Doing, and Deserving in Mansfield Park

Chapter:
(p.53) 2. The One and the Manor
Source:
Corporate Romanticism
Author(s):

Daniel M. Stout

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823272235.003.0003

Chapter two reassesses the conservatism of Jane Austen’s 1814 novel, Mansfield Park. It argues that we have misunderstood the novel by reading it in relation to the late eighteenth-century philosophy of Edmund Burke and socially conservative novelists like Jane West when, in fact, Mansfield Park is governed by a much older of social organization—the manor—not based on the liberal assumption of possessive individualism. Seeing the novel through the lens of the manor, the chapter argues, helps explain many of its most perplexing and difficult features: among them, the meekness of Fanny Price; the dissatisfactions of its ending; and the often distant or impersonal strategies of narration.

Keywords:   Jane Austen, Edmund Burke, conservative novelists, free indirect discourse, manor, Mansfield Park, possessive individualism

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .