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The Common GrowlToward a Poetics of Precarious Community$
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Thomas Claviez

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823270910

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823270910.001.0001

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Literature, the World, and You

Literature, the World, and You

Chapter:
(p.72) Literature, the World, and You
Source:
The Common Growl
Author(s):

Djelal Kadir

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823270910.003.0005

Beginning with Quintilian’s examination of the concept of metaphor, this essay seeks to further thought on world literature by coming to terms with the communitarian implications of such a concept. In effectively reversing common concerns about world literature’s scope, and even its possibility, the prospect of a literary world comes to the fore. The project, then, of mondialisation takes new shape when examining the works of three disparate authors: Lu Chi, Andrew Marvell, and Jorge Luis Borges. Using this analysis, we can see how literature forces the negotiation and contemplation of the self and communal world and the world of others via the intervention of the literary world that does not submit to the singular concession of being self nor other. Finally, the concept of littérature-monde is analyzed as posing a unique problem for the traditional questions and aims of world literature.

Keywords:   Borges, littérature-monde, Lu Chi, marvell, metaphor, mondialisation, Quintilian, world literature

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