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Ending and Unending AgonyOn Maurice Blanchot$
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Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823264575

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823264575.001.0001

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Ending and Unending Agony

Ending and Unending Agony

Chapter:
(p.71) Ending and Unending Agony
Source:
Ending and Unending Agony
Author(s):

Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe

, Hannes Opelz
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823264575.003.0006

In this chapter, Lacoue-Labarthe contrasts and compares two versions of a fragmentary text by Blanchot, the final version of which appears in The Writing of the Disaster. The comparison enables Lacoue-Labarthe to highlight but also problematize Blanchot’s attempt at deconstructing his own writing. References are made to Hegel and Heidegger but also, especially, to psychoanalysis, namely Leclaire, Winnicott, Lacan, and Freud. The chapter discusses concepts of agony, anteriority, origin, memory, fiction, work, death, and ecstasy. It also comments on the status of mythological figures (Orpheus, Narcissus) in Blanchot’s work and argues that his later writings seek to deconstruct such figures. The chapter concludes by questioning Blanchot’s use of the term “disaster.”

Keywords:   Deconstruction, agony, origin, memory, fiction, Leclaire, Winnicott, Lacan, death, myth

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