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So Conceived and So DedicatedIntellectual Life in the Civil War Era North$
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Lorien Foote and Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823264476

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823264476.001.0001

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Lessons of War

Lessons of War

Three Civil War Veterans and the Goals of Postwar Education

Chapter:
(p.129) Lessons of War
Source:
So Conceived and So Dedicated
Author(s):

Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823264476.003.0007

In this essay, Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai argues that the American Civil War strengthened rather than weakened three college-educated individuals’ commitment to lessons about gentlemanly character. Additionally, the war reinforced these men’s nationalistic tendencies. Examining the postwar educational careers of Joshua Chamberlain (Bowdoin College), Oliver Howard (Howard University and Lincoln Memorial University), and Samuel Armstrong (Hampton Institute), the essay notes how all three attempted to instill virtues of manly character in their students. Each faced different challenges: Chamberlain and Howard respectively confronted critics and opponents from the student body and southern whites whereas Armstrong traded freedmen’s civil rights for industrial skills.

Keywords:   Kanisorn Wongsrichanalai, Joshua Chamberlain, Oliver Howard, Samuel Armstrong, Bowdoin College, Howard University, Lincoln Memorial University, Hampton Institute, History of Education, Character

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