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Thresholds of ListeningSound, Technics, Space$
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Sander van Maas

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823264377

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823264377.001.0001

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“Antennas Have Long Since Invaded Our Brains”

“Antennas Have Long Since Invaded Our Brains”

Listening to the “Other Music” in Friedrich Kittler

Chapter:
(p.89) Chapter 5 “Antennas Have Long Since Invaded Our Brains”
Source:
Thresholds of Listening
Author(s):

Melle Jan Kromhout

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823264377.003.0006

This chapter examines the revolutin in media within music based on Friedrich Kittler's work. It highlights Kittler's musical preferences, from Richard Wagner to Jimi Hendrix and Pink Floyd. For Kittler this music exemplified an “other music” that was based on a cutout from the totality of “worldwide noise” as it was theorized after Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche, and not on a theory of harmonic order. It also considers Kittler's turn toward noise, interpreting it to be a turn away from language as a model for music and toward mathematics and media as a model. Finally, it discusses how sound became the new anchor for listening in the twentieth century and argues that Kittler's practice and concept of listening may be understood as replacing interpretation with feedback systems.

Keywords:   media, music, Friedrich Kittler, Pink Floyd, other music, worldwide noise, mathematics, sound, listening, feedback systems

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