Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Pragmatism with PurposeSelected Writings$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Hare, Joseph Palencik, Douglas Anderson, and Steven A. Miller

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823264322

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823264322.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

The Death Penalty Debate

The Death Penalty Debate

A Humanist’s Understanding of America’s Social Problems

Chapter:
(p.270) Nineteen The Death Penalty Debate
Source:
Pragmatism with Purpose
Author(s):

Peter Hare

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823264322.003.0019

This chapter examines the issue of death penalty as it relates to social problems in America from a humanist perspective. It begins with some history on executions in the United States, citing developments that tended to discourage the death penalty, including the rise of social sciences that led to belief in determinism and more and more serious doubts about the nature of crime and criminality. It then considers some of the factors that played an important role in how the death penalty has been perceived; how death penalty relates to issues such as prisons and drug laws; and the impact of the movement for “victim's rights” on the death penalty debate. The chapter suggests that the number of executions in the United States is more likely to increase than to decrease in the near term.

Keywords:   death penalty, social problems, executions, United States, social sciences, crime, criminality, prisons, drug laws, victim's rights

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .