Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dancing Jacobins$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rafael Sánchez

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263653

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263653.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Theater for the Masses

Theater for the Masses

Chapter:
(p.148) Chapter 4 Theater for the Masses
Source:
Dancing Jacobins
Author(s):

Rafael Sánchez

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263653.003.0006

Chapter four takes off from the urgent attempt on the part of Venezuela’s Founding Fathers to erect a theatre of political representation during the brief interval known as the First Republic. After proposing a “theatrical paradigm” detailing the prerequisites that must be met for any representation to come about, this chapter accounts for the rapidity with which this political theatre collapsed in terms of its inability to meet one of these prerequisites: namely, the immobilization of the population as a largely passive audience whose members have been wrested from their mimetic wandering and forcibly made to focus on their representatives on the stage of the polity. Without such immobilization the nation’s representatives or tribunes are ultimately unable to re-present the ‘people.’ Once the writings of Venezuela’s Founding Fathers have been shown to presuppose an entire theatrical machinery as the infrastructure of the politics of exemplarity that, to this day, is characteristic of the nation’s republicanism, the chapter goes on to make clear that it is the mentioned inability to lastingly immobilize the masses that accounts not only for the failure of the First Republic, but, more generally, for the endemic instability and larger than life histrionic tendencies of Venezuela’s republicanism.

Keywords:   histrionism, immobilization, mimesis, mobility, representation, republicanism, theatre

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .