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Divine EnjoymentA Theology of Passion and Exuberance$
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Elaine Padilla

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263561

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263561.001.0001

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Yearning

Yearning

Traces of the Divine Erotic Existence in the Cosmos

Chapter:
(p.45) Two Yearning
Source:
Divine Enjoyment
Author(s):

Elaine Padilla

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263561.003.0003

This chapter offers a re-appropriation for Christianity of the concept of God’s erotic yearning prevalent in early theological works by interweaving in an unconventional manner a dialog held primarily between Denys the Areopagite on the God who desires and St. Thomas Aquinas on the God who enjoys creation. The figure of an ecstatic lover who seeks enjoyment with creation in amorous ways serves as an initial sketch of the Beloved Lover whose enjoyment stems from stirring all things toward greater forms of enjoyment. Challenging the classical model of divine happiness which contentment is solely of Godself, this chapter’s notion of divine yearning begins to break free from the self-encircling motions of absolute per se subsistence by offering the start of the possibility of a God-cosmos relationship that is intimately and mutually enjoyable.

Keywords:   yearning, appetite, subsistence, contentment, contemplation, happiness, eros, happy, beloved, ecstasy

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