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After FukushimaThe Equivalence of Catastrophes$
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Jean-Luc Nancy

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263387

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263387.001.0001

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Chapter:
(p.17) 4
Source:
After Fukushima
Author(s):

Jean-Luc Nancy

, Charlotte Mandell
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263387.003.0005

This chapter starts with a question which contains a play on words: Civilization of the irremediable or an irremediable civilization? Freud then comes into the picture with terms he used more or less in what he describes as nearing malaise or discontent. Though the energy of the atom had not yet been discovered in 1929, Freud augured that humanity will destroy itself as it is able to overcome nature in so many ways. Camus would have described Hiroshima as the brutal suicidal act of civilization. Maybe, what is meant is not civilization in its entirety since the atom has many non-military uses. But Nishitani could only describe the utilization of the atom as a “war without enemy,” because it is a war against humanity. This is exemplified after Hiroshima by Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and then Fukushima. What can happen next is an apocalypse or revelation and unveiling. But, more probably a satori or awakening to nothingness and with no understanding is what will follow.

Keywords:   Freud, Camus, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, apocalypse, satori

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