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After FukushimaThe Equivalence of Catastrophes$
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Jean-Luc Nancy

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263387

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263387.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 June 2017

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Chapter:
(p.12) 2
Source:
After Fukushima
Author(s):

Jean-Luc Nancy

, Charlotte Mandell
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263387.003.0003

This chapter compares and analyzes the atrocious man-made disasters in the past. Auschwitz and Hiroshima have something in common, that is, a crossing of limits. But this limit is different from the limits of morality or humanity. The limits can give shape to meaning. Fukushima, meanwhile, may not be all what it was meant to be. Fukushima does not comprise all the regions that had been affected by the catastrophe, places such as Iwate and Miyage. It does not also include the overexploitation of the locations of the Japanese central government in the north east. Thus, Hiroshima is different from Fukushima because the former was the target of enemy bombing, while Fukushima is a bit more complex, as it was composed of several natural, technological, political, and economic phenomena.

Keywords:   Iwate, Miyage, Japanese central government, Hiroshima, Fukushima

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