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What's These Worlds Coming To?$
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Jean-Luc Nancy and Aurélien Barrau

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263332

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263332.001.0001

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Less Than One, Then

Less Than One, Then

Chapter:
(p.21) Less Than One, Then
Source:
What's These Worlds Coming To?
Author(s):

Jean-Luc Nancy

Aurélien Barrau

, Travis Holloway, Flor Méchain
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263332.003.0003

This chapter discusses how the one as a pure singular, an identity unto itself, has not taken place, nor has it ever started to take place. Again, there seems to be a play of words where the strike that rings the bell is a called mediation more than causing a meditation. The first vibration of the knell is only denoted after the second one is heard, so it is not one without two of them. Furthermore, and it becomes correspondingly more abstruse, it is also not two without referring to some distance of the other. It is said that the cadence of the “More than one” is simple and unvarying. In a forward leap, It is shown as an enumeration of more than one possible world. Further into this exposition, the concept of multiple worlds as expressed by Goodman follows a numeric schema where these worlds afford identification, location, and countability. In other words, this reference to being more than one is making sure it will not appropriate for itself a new judicative authority.

Keywords:   multiple worlds, Goodman, numeric schema, judicative authority

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