Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The End of the World and Other Teachable MomentsJacques Derrida's Final Seminar$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Naas

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263288

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263288.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Reinventing the Wheel

Reinventing the Wheel

Of Sovereignty, Autobiography, and Deconstruction

Chapter:
(p.83) 4 Reinventing the Wheel
Source:
The End of the World and Other Teachable Moments
Author(s):

Michael Naas

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263288.003.0005

This chapter looks at the life of Robinson Crusoe and how he made things around him for his convenience and comfort. To Derrida, Robinson's situation brings up questions of autobiography and the world that would result from an analysis of Crusoe's creations or inventions. An autobiography is compared to the figure of a wheel where the self takes a detour but eventually returns to himself in the process of self-discovery. The main theme of Derrida in these terms is the impossibility of returning home, or the point of one's departure, or even the preoccupation of deconstruction. Deconstruction is even considered as the beginning of the reinvention of the wheel, the end of the circle of thinking to start and take on a new journey and new self-identity. He questions the importance of returning, circularity, and homecoming in “Violence and Metaphysics.” In the end, Derrida speaks that in returning, there is always iteration, original difference, and supplementarity because for every one turn of the wheel, there is always added another point of departure where one can start from.

Keywords:   Robinson Crusoe, self-discovery, preoccupation of deconstruction, reinvention of the wheel

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .