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Responding to LossHeideggerian Reflections on Literature, Architecture, and Film$
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Robert Mugerauer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263240

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263240.001.0001

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Art, Architecture, Violence

Art, Architecture, Violence

Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum Berlin

Chapter:
(p.47) 2 Art, Architecture, Violence
Source:
Responding to Loss
Author(s):

Robert Mugerauer

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263240.003.0002

The essay moves from art and architecture that discloses the violence, displacement and loss inherent in human life to explore how Liebeskind's Jewish Museum Berlin responds to the Holocaust that calls on us for a further response. With Levinas and Arendt it is found that the distinctly human capacity to murder paradoxically affirms rather than obliterates both victims and murderers as persons. Libeskind's building shows itself as a site for considering political life, especially the critical dimensions of acting and giving witness in the face of death. The Museum's design, drawing, forms, materials, and systems, and afforded experiences non-conceptually lay before us testimony that violence and loss cannot annihilate personhood or responsibility.

Keywords:   Architecture, Arendt, Art, Berlin, Design, Holocaust, Jewish Museum, Levinas, Libeskind, Responsibility

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