Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
DivinanimalityAnimal Theory, Creaturely Theology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen Moore

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263196

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263196.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 April 2018

Little Bird in My Praying Hands:

Little Bird in My Praying Hands:

Rainer Maria Rilke and God’s Animal Body

Chapter:
(p.134) Little Bird in My Praying Hands
Source:
Divinanimality
Author(s):

Beatrice Marovich

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263196.003.0009

Beatrice Marovich's essay brings Jacques Derrida's animal philosophy into dialogue with Rainer Maria Rilke's animal theology as crafted in his Stories of God and Book of Hours. For Rilke, animals have a privileged relationship to a space-time he termed The Open and through it to the divine, while humans can neither perceive nor enter The Open. Marovich explores the oblique relationship between Rilke's Open and Derrida's divinanimality—another extra-human time-space co-inhabited by gods and animals. The creaturely God that emerges in The Open finds consummate expression as the fragile bird wriggling in the praying hands of a child, signifying to the child that God is real, even though God must disappear when the prayer is over.

Keywords:   Animality studies, Animal theology, Rainer Maria Rilke, Jacques Derrida

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .