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DivinanimalityAnimal Theory, Creaturely Theology$
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Stephen Moore

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263196

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263196.001.0001

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Animal Calls

Animal Calls

Chapter:
(p.116) Animal Calls
Source:
Divinanimality
Author(s):

Kate Rigby

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263196.003.0008

Kate Rigby's essay extends Donna Haraway's “respectful curiosity” to undomesticated animal others, epitomized for Rigby by the magpie, a familiar sight and sound in her corner of Australia. Throughout her essay, Rigby urges human attention to the semiosis of the more-than-human world. Ultimately she asks us to ponder how nonhuman animals might be considered to be calling upon humans in the context of the current humanly engendered mass extinction event. She notes that animal oracles, not least bird oracles, have abounded in many traditional cultures, and narrates a dream in which a magpie plays an ecoprophetic role. The magpie's call, summoning human beings of out solipsistic self-enclosure, sounds on behalf of the innumerable voiceless or silenced creatures who are in the frontline of environmental devastation.

Keywords:   Animality studies, Mass extinction, Magpies

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