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DivinanimalityAnimal Theory, Creaturely Theology$
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Stephen Moore

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263196

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263196.001.0001

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Daniel’s Animal Apocalypse

Daniel’s Animal Apocalypse

Chapter:
(p.182) Daniel’s Animal Apocalypse
Source:
Divinanimality
Author(s):

Jennifer L. Koosed

Robert Paul Seesengood

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263196.003.0012

Jennifer Koosed and Robert Paul Seesengood's jointly authored essay plunges us into one of the most animal-populous books of the Bible. The first half of the essay ponders four encounters that the Book of Daniel's eponymous hero has with animals. Each encounter entails transformation from human to animal either enacted (Nebuchadnezzar into grazing animal; empires into hybrid monsters) or denied (Daniel into lion), and each entails a revelation of what Jacques Derrida has termed divinanimality. The second half of the essay brings postcolonial themes into dialogue with animality themes across the catastrophe-ridden space of the Book of Daniel. Aided by Giorgio Agamben and Donna Haraway, the authors reflect on how this apocalypse consigns entire human populations to the category of the killable in a logic that relies on the killability of the animal.

Keywords:   Animality studies, The Book of Daniel, Jacques Derrida, Giorgio Agamben, Donna Haraway

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