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Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy
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Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy

Gyula Klima

Abstract

It is a commonplace in the history of ideas that one of the few medieval philosophical contributions preserved in modern philosophical thought is the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality: their intrinsic directedness toward some object. Nevertheless, medieval philosophers routinely described ordinary physical phenomena, such as reflections in mirrors or sounds in the air, as exhibiting intentionality, while they described what modern philosophers would take to be typically mental phenomena, such as sensation and imagination, as ordinary p ... More

Keywords: intentionality, cognition, mental representation, medieval philosophy, Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, Buridan

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2015 Print ISBN-13: 9780823262748
Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015 DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823262748.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Gyula Klima, editor
Fordham University