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Transferential Poetics, from Poe to Warhol$
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Adam Frank

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823262465

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823262465.001.0001

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Vis-à-vis Television: Andy Warhol’s Therapeutics

Vis-à-vis Television: Andy Warhol’s Therapeutics

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(p.119) 5 / Vis-à-vis Television: Andy Warhol’s Therapeutics
Source:
Transferential Poetics, from Poe to Warhol
Author(s):

Adam Frank

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823262465.003.0006

This chapter argues that Andy Warhol identified with television as both technology and institution. It brings the affect theories of Melanie Klein and Silvan Tomkins to readings of Warhol’s early film and video work. The chapter shows how Warhol adopted a televisual perspective on emotion, permitting him to develop his celebrity. It turns to Foucault’s late lectures on ancient therapeutics in a reading of The Philosophy of Andy Warhol to argue that television served as a therapeutic device that offered Warhol the technical means to become himself. The chapter shows how Foucault and Warhol share an underexamined set of relations to midcentury cybernetics, and concludes by suggesting that Warhol may be read by way of Foucault's meditations on the ancient Cynics.

Keywords:   television, affect, cybernetics, therapeutics, Cynics, Andy Warhol, Michel Foucault

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