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The Relevance of Royce$
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Kelly A. Parker and Jason Bell

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823255283

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823255283.001.0001

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Racism, Race, and Josiah Royce

Racism, Race, and Josiah Royce

Exactly What Shall We Say?

Chapter:
(p.162) Nine Racism, Race, and Josiah Royce
Source:
The Relevance of Royce
Author(s):

Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823255283.003.0010

Royce's 1908 essay, “Race Questions and Prejudices” has been the subject of various interpretations and some controversy. This piece addresses some of the criticisms, focusing on the following questions: (1) Is he really attacking the scientific racism in his time? (2) Is his discussion of Japan in his article a reflection of racial views in his time? (3) Does his use of the case studies of Jamaica and Trinidad in his “Race Questions” and his relationship to Sir Sydney Olivier demonstrate that he is a “white imperialist? (4) Does his discussion of “assimilation” in the “Race Questions” essay and other works indicate that he is a white supremacist? and (5) what is his understanding of the phrase “antipathies?” I also offer some reflections on the complexities of dealing philosophically with “race questions.”

Keywords:   scientific racism, the case of Japan, white imperialist, Sir Sydney Oliver, assimilation, antipathies

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