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The Problem of the Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth CenturyThe Essential Early Essays$
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W.E.B. Du Bois and Nahum Dimitri Chandler

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823254545

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823254545.001.0001

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The Conservation of Races

The Conservation of Races

1897

Chapter:
(p.51) The Conservation of Races
Source:
The Problem of the Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Author(s):

W. E. B. DU BOIS

, Nahum Dimitri Chandler
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823254545.003.0003

This chapter presents an essay by W. E. B. Du Bois that deals with the issue of race. He raises questions such as: What is the real meaning of race. What has, in the past, been the law of race development? What lessons has the past history of race development to teach the rising Negro people? He describes the American Negro Academy, which aims at once to be the epitome and expression of the intellect of the black-blooded people of America, the exponent of the race ideals of one of the world's great races. He concludes by outlining a proposed creed for the Academy.

Keywords:   W. E. B. Du Bois, race development, American Negro, African Americans, race relations, American Negro Academy

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