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The Problem of the Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth CenturyThe Essential Early Essays$
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W.E.B. Du Bois and Nahum Dimitri Chandler

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823254545

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823254545.001.0001

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The Afro-American

The Afro-American

ca. 1894

Chapter:
(p.33) The Afro-American
Source:
The Problem of the Color Line at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Author(s):

W. E. B. DU BOIS

, Nahum Dimitri Chandler
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823254545.003.0002

This chapter presents an essay by W. E. B. Du Bois that discusses the rise of Afro-American, the attitude of the American State toward its citizens of African descent, and the so-called “Negro Problem.” He acknowledges that Afro-Americans form a large part of the many social problems confronting the American nation. He also says that the biggest obstacle faced by Afro-Americans in gaining the respect of civilization is the unreasoning and unreasonable prejudice of the nation, which persists in rating the ignorant and vicious white man above the intelligent and striving colored man, under any and all circumstances.

Keywords:   W. E. B. Du Bois, Afro-Americans, race, American state, Negro Problem, white man, colored man

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