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Divine MultiplicityTrinities, Diversities, and the Nature of Relation$
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Chris Boesel and S. Wesley Ariarajah

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780823253951

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823253951.001.0001

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Spirited Transformations

Spirited Transformations

Pneumatology as a Resource for Comparative Theology

Chapter:
(p.137) Spirited Transformations
Source:
Divine Multiplicity
Author(s):

Holly Hillgardner

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823253951.003.0008

This chapter explores the capacity of the religious symbol of the Spirit to enrich and complicate thought about the one and the many across the religions. It begins by noting the extent to which the reality of Spirit is witnessed in various ways across religious traditions. It proposes Spirit as a broadly accessible and so especially apt symbol of divinity's relation to multiplicity for the work of comparative theology. The chapter also engages in a comparative theological reading of Sankara (an early medieval Indian Advaitan Hindu) and Catherine of Siena (a fourteenth-century European Dominican Christian). Drawing on these two seemingly disparate religious resources, it expounds four dimensions of Spirit that open the Christian tradition up and into the space of interreligious, comparative theological relation: Spirit as the matrix of creation; support for the logic of multiplicity; as interrelated love; and the destabilizer of static ontologies.

Keywords:   religious symbol, spirit, Sankara, Catherine of Siena, religious pluralism, Christianity

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