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Spirit and the Obligation of Social FleshA Secular Theology for the Global City$
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Sharon V. Betcher

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780823253906

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823253906.001.0001

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Breathing through the Pain

Breathing through the Pain

Engaging the Cross as Tonglen, Taking to the Streets as Mendicants

Chapter:
(p.68) Three Breathing through the Pain
Source:
Spirit and the Obligation of Social Flesh
Author(s):

Sharon V. Betcher

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823253906.003.0004

Returning yet again to consider the aestheticization of fear, this chapter concerns itself with the chasm created around so as to withhold bodies perceived to be in pain. Consequently, the chapter draws upon Buddhist practices of tonglen, of breathing through the pain, to open similar echoes in Martin Luther’s theology of the cross and Dorothy Soelle’s theology of suffering as well as to challenge the ways in which pain has been withheld from metaphysics. Here religious philosophies attempt to train seculars towards practices of shouldering with each other the pains of existence.

Keywords:   Pain, Tonglen, Martin Luther, Cross, Mendicant, Beggar, Suffering, Metaphysics, Pema Chodron, Dorothy Soelle, Eckhart Tolle, Anantanand Rambachan, Simone Weil

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