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The Twenty-Fifth AmendmentIts Complete History and Application$
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John D. Feerick

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780823252008

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823252008.001.0001

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Presidential Inability

Presidential Inability

Chapter:
(p.3) 1 Presidential Inability
Source:
The Twenty-Fifth Amendment
Author(s):

John D. Feerick

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823252008.003.0001

This chapter discusses the subject of presidential inability and who should determine its existence and termination. The founders thought they had handled the question adequately in drafting the clause in the Constitution on presidential succession. For the first fifty-two years of the existence of the presidency, no president died in office. Before the adoption of the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, however, the country had to deal with President Madison’s inability, President Harrison’s death, President Taylor’s death, President Lincoln’s death, President Garfield’s inability, Vice President Arthur’s inability, President Cleveland’s inability, President McKinley’s death, President Wilson’s inability, President Harding’s death, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s inability, President Eisenhower’s inability, and President Kennedy’s death.

Keywords:   Death, assassination, illness, inability, disability

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