Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Lincoln and LeadershipMilitary, Political, and Religious Decision Making$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Randall M. Miller

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823243440

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823243440.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 26 September 2017

Lincoln and Leadership: An Afterword

Lincoln and Leadership: An Afterword

Chapter:
(p.96) 5. Lincoln and Leadership: An Afterword
Source:
Lincoln and Leadership
Author(s):

Allen C. Guelzo

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823243440.003.0005

In this chapter Allen C. Guelzo argues that Lincoln’s presidency was what political scientists term a “hinge presidency” because of the ways he reoriented the power of the office as Commander in Chief, secured the presidency from undue congressional and other interference, subordinated the Cabinet to the presidential will, and converted the Republican Party to the economic development of the country as a friend of business. It argues that Lincoln’s experience as lawyer arguing cases before the people made him an effective party leader and shaper of public opinion, and his intelligence, curiosity, and self-confidence made him a great war president. It notes that the particular qualities of persistence, resilience, humility, knowledge, loving the drudgery of politics and the office, and persuasion distinguished Lincoln and defined the essential elements for a successful democratic president in any day. It concludes that although Lincoln’s self-confidence sometimes approached arrogance, Lincoln understood the nature and uses of power and did not abuse them. He earned his place on the top pedestal of presidential leaders.

Keywords:   Presidential power, Republican Party, Commander in Chief, Leadership qualities, Public opinion

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .