Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Lincoln and LeadershipMilitary, Political, and Religious Decision Making$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Randall M. Miller

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823243440

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823243440.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 November 2017

Seeing Lincoln's Blind Memorandum

Seeing Lincoln's Blind Memorandum

Chapter:
(p.60) 3 Seeing Lincoln's Blind Memorandum
Source:
Lincoln and Leadership
Author(s):

Matthew Pinsker

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823243440.003.0003

This chapter by Matthew Pinsker argues that Lincoln has been underappreciated as a party leader and shows how he managed his Cabinet and the Republican Party to quash the challenge of Salmon P. Chase to unseat him as the party’s presidential nominee and carried the election in 1864. It argues that Lincoln believed in the centrality of party politics for an effective democracy and that he paid much attention to details of party management, such as appointments, as a party leader. It argues that Lincoln’s use of his so-called Blind Memorandum revealed his belief that only a Republican victory in the 1864 elections could save the Union and secure the promise of emancipation because Democrats would compromise with the Confederacy if elected. Lincoln was prepared to accept the will of the people in 1864 but at the same time would use any means to win the war if Democrats won in 1864. In the end, Lincoln’s astute behind-the-scenes negotiations with party leaders in the states and Congress, understandings with newspaper editors, and management of competing interests among Cabinet members gave him control over the party’s fortunes and won the day.

Keywords:   Blind Memorandum, Republican Party, Election of 1864, Lincoln and his Cabinet, Party politics, Civil War

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .