Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Decolonizing EpistemologiesLatina/o Theology and Philosophy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ada Maria Isasi-Diaz and Eduardo Mendieta

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823241354

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823241354.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 August 2018

“Racism is not intellectual”: Interracial Friendship, Multicultural Literature, and Decolonizing Epistemologies

“Racism is not intellectual”: Interracial Friendship, Multicultural Literature, and Decolonizing Epistemologies

Chapter:
(p.169) “Racism is not intellectual”: Interracial Friendship, Multicultural Literature, and Decolonizing Epistemologies
Source:
Decolonizing Epistemologies
Author(s):

Paula M. L. Moya

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823241354.003.0009

The essay written by Paula Moya offers the reader two possible strategies for decolonial action: interracial friendships and multicultural literature. Moya's argument is grounded in an exposition of the role of emotions in cognition. Emotions have “crucial epistemic value,” for they make it possible to discern “larger social meanings and entrenched social arrangements.” The essay explains how interracial friendships involve a sharing of experiences about race and racism that can lead to moral growth and to the increased knowledge for the interracial friends of how race functions in society. In the last part of the chapter, the author shows how literature written by racial and cultural minorities can “expand a reader's horizon of possibility for experiential encounters,” because of the intellectual and emotional engagement involved in reading a novel. The aim of the chapter is to demonstrate how both interracial friendships and multicultural novels can be effective antiracist projects.

Keywords:   Interracial friendship, multiculturalist literature, cognition, affect, moral growth

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .