Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Decolonizing EpistemologiesLatina/o Theology and Philosophy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ada Maria Isasi-Diaz and Eduardo Mendieta

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823241354

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823241354.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2017

Epistemology, Ethics, and the Time/Space of Decolonization: Perspectives from the Caribbean and the Latina/o Americas

Epistemology, Ethics, and the Time/Space of Decolonization: Perspectives from the Caribbean and the Latina/o Americas

Chapter:
(p.193) Epistemology, Ethics, and the Time/Space of Decolonization: Perspectives from the Caribbean and the Latina/o Americas
Source:
Decolonizing Epistemologies
Author(s):

Nelson Maldonado-Torres

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823241354.003.0010

In an explication of what he calls “postcontinental philosophy,” Nelson Maldonado-Torres's essay connects Frantz Fanon's view of subjectivity and his Caribbean migrant imaginary with that of Gloria Anzaldúa's borderlands, a spatial reference that informs her views on subjectivity and knowledge. The author sees Fanon's view of self, constituted by “desires for entering in relation with others,” as the possible inspiration for “a decolonial politics that opposes anything that betrays the ethical orientation of the self.” Anzaldúa's commitment to relationality leads her to reject as elements of ethnic identity that which “betrays the condition of the human as a bordered subject who is open to others in relations of hospitality and generosity.” In the second section of the essay, the author argues that ethnic studies is the theoretical arm of the decolonizing project insofar as it exposes the complicity of the modern research university with the first world vision of the world. Ethnic studies breaks with dominant epistemes by relating knowledges with histories of struggle and resistance, and by overcoming the logic of colonization of natural resources and of the body and mind, particularly of people of color.

Keywords:   Post-continental philosophy, decolonization, Ethnic studies, geography of reason, Caribbean thought

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .