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Beyond the Mushroom CloudCommemoration, Religion, and Responsibility after Hiroshima$
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Yuki Miyamoto

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823240500

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823240500.001.0001

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Toward a Community of Memory

Toward a Community of Memory

Chapter:
(p.13) 1 Toward a Community of Memory
Source:
Beyond the Mushroom Cloud
Author(s):

Yuki Miyamoto

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823240500.003.0002

The historical event of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has often been discussed from within a discourse based upon nation-state boundaries. While the following chapter discusses Japanese nationalism built around the atomic bomb experience, this chapter reveals that framing discussion of the destruction of the bomb within nation-state frameworks obscures the indiscriminate nature of nuclear weaponry; such discussions fail to account for those who lie outside such boundaries (for example, Koreans residing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the time of the bombings), while casting others-who may or may not have been in Hiroshima or Nagasaki in August 1945—as “authentic” victims of the bombings. Thus, arguing against philosopher Avishai Margalit's notion that a nation can be a community of memory, I introduce Hiroshima city's attempts to be a community of memory that is open to any nationalities.

Keywords:   A Community of Memory, Hiroshima, Avishai Margalit, the Smithsonian Debate, Enola Gay

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