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Answering AuschwitzPrimo Levi's Science and Humanism after the Fall$
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Stanislao G. Pugliese

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233588

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823233588.001.0001

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The Humanity and Humanism of Primo Levi

The Humanity and Humanism of Primo Levi

Chapter:
(p.87) Chapter 6 The Humanity and Humanism of Primo Levi
Source:
Answering Auschwitz
Author(s):

Joseph Farrell

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823233588.003.0007

In a wide-ranging, polemical lecture in Turin in 1979, Primo Levi discussed the roots and variations of racial prejudice in history, finding early traces of the phenomenon even in the seemingly innocuous biblical verse in the Canticle of Canticles, “Nigra sum sed formosa.” (I am black but beautiful.) The very title of the work, If This Is a Man, implies the same anguished questioning on humanity and humanism that is present in the lecture, and in both works Nazism is presented as the very denial of humanism as well as of the humanitarian spirit and even of shared humanity. It can be noted that the distinguishing feature of Levi's account of the Holocaust is the prominence given to the malevolent process of dehumanization.

Keywords:   Primo Levi, humanity, humanism, Nazism, Holocaust, dehumanization

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