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Go FigureEnergies, Forms, and Institutions in the Early Modern World$
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Judith H. Anderson and Joan Pong Linton

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233496

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823233496.001.0001

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Entertaining Friends: Falstaff's Parasitology

Entertaining Friends: Falstaff's Parasitology

Chapter:
(p.132) Entertaining Friends: Falstaff's Parasitology
Source:
Go Figure
Author(s):

Judith H. Anderson

Joan Pong Linton

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823233496.003.0008

Shakespeare's frequent friendship pairings can congeal for us in a single figure in the imagination, one that is dyadic rather than binary. Among prominent Shakespearean pairs of this nature we immediately think of the Fool and Lear, Puck and Oberon, Enobarbus and Antony, Parolles and Bertram, among others. Friendship's political implications for the early modern period have been admirably studied by Laurie Shannon in an important examination of “sovereign amity.” The complications raised by representations of entertainer/entertained friendships, however, may invite further consideration of Shannon's argument that Renaissance friendship entails utopian ideals for the polity from its expectation of equality between friends.

Keywords:   friends, Shakespeare, sovereign amity, Laurie Shannon, friendship, equality

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