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Domesticating a Religious ImportThe Jesuits and the Inculturation of the Catholic Church in Zimbabwe, 1879-1980$
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Nicholas M. Creary

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233342

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823233342.001.0001

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“The Most Important Work on the Mission”: The Seminary of Saints John Fisher and Thomas More, 1919–1979

“The Most Important Work on the Mission”: The Seminary of Saints John Fisher and Thomas More, 1919–1979

Chapter:
(p.79) 3 “The Most Important Work on the Mission”: The Seminary of Saints John Fisher and Thomas More, 1919–1979
Source:
Domesticating a Religious Import
Author(s):

Nicholas M. Creary

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823233342.003.0004

In a commentary assessing the causes of the 1974 strike, W. F. Rea opined that many Africans became Catholics and entered the seminary for “unworthy motives, and mixed ones,” alleging they did so for the only higher educational opportunities available at the time. “But when they see their contemporaries in secondary schools and the Universities making more progress than they,” he continued, “they cannot face up to the fact that this is due to their own lack of capacity and blame everyone and everything except themselves.” He similarly alleged that Africans chose to become priests for the social status that advanced education in seminary training would bring them, and absolved the seminary administration of any responsibility for the strike. This chapter examines the changing relations between European Jesuit missionaries and African seminarians from the early 1930s to 1975.

Keywords:   Africans, Catholics, educational opportunities, priests, social status, Jesuit missionaries

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