Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Domesticating a Religious ImportThe Jesuits and the Inculturation of the Catholic Church in Zimbabwe, 1879-1980$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nicholas M. Creary

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233342

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823233342.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 January 2018

“The Struggle Approximated to the Heroic”: African Catholic Women Becoming Nuns in Colonial Zimbabwe, 1922–1965

“The Struggle Approximated to the Heroic”: African Catholic Women Becoming Nuns in Colonial Zimbabwe, 1922–1965

Chapter:
(p.39) 2 “The Struggle Approximated to the Heroic”: African Catholic Women Becoming Nuns in Colonial Zimbabwe, 1922–1965
Source:
Domesticating a Religious Import
Author(s):

Nicholas M. Creary

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823233342.003.0003

In August 1965, the community of the Little Children of our Blessed Lady (or LCBL Sisters) at Hwedza asked Sister Rocha Mushonga to accompany Sister Ancilla, their delegate to the congregation's first general chapter, as a secretary. Thus began the indigenization of the LCBL Sisters' leadership. This chapter describes how small groups of soft-spoken yet resolute groups of African women became nuns. The stories and experiences of these African nuns clearly shows them as agents taking some measure of control over their lives, and their actions had significant effects on African culture as well as on the relations between European administrators and missionaries. These were not merely passive, docile women who did what they were told to do by parents, priests, or politicians. Rather, they defied their parents and their culture. African men's actions also contributed to the forging of a new Southern Rhodesian colonial social practice.

Keywords:   LCBL Sisters, African women, nuns, European administrators, missionaries

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .