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Catholic Social LearningEducating the Faith That Does Justice$
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Roger Bergman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233281

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823233281.001.0001

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Education for Justice and the Catholic University: Innovation or Development? An Argument from Tradition

Education for Justice and the Catholic University: Innovation or Development? An Argument from Tradition

Chapter:
(p.119) 7 Education for Justice and the Catholic University: Innovation or Development? An Argument from Tradition
Source:
Catholic Social Learning
Author(s):

Roger Bergman

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823233281.003.0007

This chapter addresses the foundational question of the place of justice education within the Catholic university. Here, John Henry Cardinal Newman's The Idea of a University links the discriminatory oppression of Irish Catholics in his day to their historical exclusion from British higher education. Knowledge for its own sake is knowledge for the sake of the student, especially those historically marginalized, and through them for the world and its justice. Pope John Paul II makes a similar argument in Ex Corde Ecclesiae. This chapter also traces Ignatius of Loyola's educational pilgrimage through the best universities of sixteenth-century Europe and the establishment by the newly founded Society of Jesus of the world's first school system, making the saint the world's first “superintendent of schools.” An exploration of the origins and purposes of those schools reveals that Catholic social learning in higher education is nothing new.

Keywords:   justice education, Catholic university, Irish Catholics, Loyola's educational pilgrimage, sixteenth-century Europe

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