Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Civil Rights in New York CityFrom World War II to the Giuliani Era$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Clarence Taylor

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823232895

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 January 2018

“Brooklyn College Belongs to Us”: Black Students and the Transformation of Public Higher Education in New York City

“Brooklyn College Belongs to Us”: Black Students and the Transformation of Public Higher Education in New York City

Chapter:
(p.161) 8 “Brooklyn College Belongs to Us”: Black Students and the Transformation of Public Higher Education in New York City
Source:
Civil Rights in New York City
Author(s):

Clarence Taylor

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.003.0009

Black student activism exploded in the spring of 1969. These students followed in the footsteps of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and were deeply influenced by its radical and Black Nationalist organizers, many of whom had left the South and were active on college campuses across the country. Coinciding with the grassroots community control of schools movement, African American college students in New York City aimed to redefine the relationship between educational institutions and urban black communities. In the spring of 1969, students at every single division of the City University of New York rose up in protest. Similarly, the struggle at Brooklyn College has been virtually forgotten, even though it was crucial in reshaping the admissions policy, the university's relationship to communities of color, and the curriculum.

Keywords:   Brooklyn College, black students, African American, City University, New York, higher education, admissions policy, protest

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .